“An African City” Season 2 Launches in Accra!

Oh hey dolls!

It’s Adjpants here, your Slayage and Fierceness Correspondent for West Africa *flips hair*

Let’s dive straight in! So if you’ve been following me for a while, you probably know about my obsession with Sex and the City. I loved the directness, the openness and the sheer ballsy courage of the show. It was the first time I had seen women on screen openly discussing all manner of bedroom debauchery.

So imagine my excitement when I found out that there was an African, nay, a GHANAIAN version of Sex and the City? I stumbled across “An African City” on YouTube a while back, and I was hooked within seconds. The first season of the web series followed five young Ghanaian women on their return home from the diaspora. During the series we see the returnees settling into life in Accra, navigating the (hilarious) sex and dating scene and gallivanting in incredible outfits. The show is groundbreaking in its openness, especially in an African setting where sometimes these topics are taboo. It was particularly thrilling for me because this was around the time I was considering moving back to Ghana. Watching their adventures was like a glimpse into a possible future. Sadly, my hotline doesn’t bling like theirs doe. But I digress.

I had the pleasure of meeting the show’s creator, Nicole Amarteifio, at a Blogging Ghana event last year and she was warm and delightful.

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So guys imagine my delight when I heard that there was going to be a launch party in Accra for Season 2! I died. The launch paree (yes, I said paree) was held as part of “SheHive Accra,” a women’s entrepreneurship conference brought to you by the incredible She Leads Africa organisation. SLA inspires young African women to shatter glass ceilings, be their best selves, and rewrite the rules on success. Talk about your sheroes.

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Anyhoo! Of course your girl was able to get her hot little hands on an exclusive ticket *insert flamenco dancing emoji* On Thursday night, I joined Accra’s glitterati to celebrate the launch of Season 2 with the exclusive screening of a never-before-seen episode.

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Red carpet hugsies with awesome celeb blogger Ameyaw Debrah

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The stunning venue: One Airport Square, Accra

It. Was. Lit. LAWD! We were actually shown an episode from halfway through the season, and it became clear that the ante had been upped. Production quality has improved, outfits are even more gorgeous… and… girl. The sexytime has increased to the tenth power. Neither I nor the auntie seated in front of me were quite ready. I wish I had brought pearls to clutch! I guess the only teensy thing I would say is that I’m hoping for a lot more depth and character development in Season 2. The show’s concept is gold and I can’t wait to see more.

Next up was a chat with the panel- the creator Nicole Amarteifio, actress Maame Adjei (possibly one of the nicest people I have ever met), and writer Esther Arma. They talked us through some of the decisions they had made with the show’s direction, including the fact that Season 2 will be sold on a new channel (as opposed to streamed on YouTube). We finished up with some Q&A.

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Blurry but still amazing fangirl moment with “An African City” actress Maame Adjei

I was seated next to my blogger bae Kiki of Ayiba Magazine fame, and she asked Nicole about the decision to show more #surfboardt action on screen in Season 2. Nicole responded my saying that so many people complained that there was too much sex in Season 1, so she had decided to serve up more in Season 2! WELP!

And then the evening was over and we had time to mingle and sample some of the fabulous champagne cocktails being whipped up by the lovely people from Moet & Chandon. Each of the cocktails was named after the characters in the show. You know I headed straight for a Berry Sade (Sade is the “Samantha of Am African City and my fave). It was a gorgeous end to a fun evening.

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Season 2 launches on the new channel, An African City at midday today! Y’all better run home after church! Tell Sister Beulah from the Usher Board you don’t have time to stay behind and discuss the Easter bake sale.

Until next time my darlings!

Love,
Adjpants

 

 

 

 

 

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Accra Update: Two Weeks In…

Hey!

It’s Adjpants, your Fierceness and Slayage Correspondent, coming to you live from Accra, Ghana. I wanted to give you an update on my adventure so far. Hoooo my garsh- moving “home” when you’re essentially a foreigner in your own country is NOT EASY. It’s been a stressful couple of weeks. After two days holed up crying in a darkened room, I thought it was time to put on my big girl pants and share my ongoing story. If I can help even one person who’s going through the same thing, I’ll consider this a job well done.

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So! We’re now two weeks in- here’s what we’ve learned so far.

1. Taxi Drivers Are Thieving Knobjockeys.

I just… I can’t. Taxi drivers in Accra have left me so unable to deal, like I’m fresh out of being able to deal and there is no chance of stock replenishment. They are the bane of my effing life here and I really wish I had a car. Any rich Uncles reading this who want to buy me a Camry, please #CallMeMaybe.

I have previously only spent short periods of time in Accra/been on family trips with our own car. So this level of f*ckery is new to me. The taxi drivers will cheat you on sight. Yes, even if you speak Twi they can tell you’re a foreigner and they will double or triple the price. Haggle them down mercilessly- I usually like to cut the number they give me by half, take off a couple of cedis, and start bargaining from there. Even then, sometimes you’ll get to your destination and they’ll claim not to have change so you have no choice but to overpay. This happened to me the other day and I straight out lost it. We almost came to fisticuffs and I am normally such a peaceful, jolly person. So lesson learned- carry small notes and an old lady bag of change if necessary.

Another tip: if you’ve managed to haggle the price down in Twi, don’t then get in the taxi and start talking to friends on the phone in Queen’s English. You’ll notice the driver peering at you as if you lied to him, and suddenly there will be loud claims of how the agreed price needs to increase due to traffic/time of day/the crisis in Syria. May God smite them all with herpes. Also ladies? Always sit in the back seat. Some dudes are pervs.

2. People Have No Filter and Zero Chill.

Lemme tell you a story, paint you a little word picture. I met a friend of a friend the other day, nice gentleman, friendly and fun. I thought huzzah new friend, right? Wrong. He called me and we were chatting away, and suddenly out of nowhere he asked, “Are you watching your weight?” I was like, “…Um, no…” He replied, “Don’t you think you should be?” I was like O_O and he chirped into the icy silence, “I mean, don’t you think it’s getting too much?”

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WHUT.

Do you see why I am so unable? What fresh hell is this? And this sort of piping hot nonsense is commonplace. People here are for the most part, pretty judgmental. Which would be fine if they were using their inside voices- but they’re not. They’re telling you their opinions at every opportunity. I’m sure there will be many more of these occurences. Just keep an eye out for the headlines: “Crazed Non-Weight-Watching Ex Londoner Cuts Man In Public: Says She Regrets Nothing”

3. Slow Your Roll- You’re The Only One Rushing.

Coming from London where my life was a constant race against the clock, I find the slooooow pace of life in Accra maddening. I’m used to the big city where people will throw you into oncoming traffic if you’re walking just a touch too slowly. Here everything takes forever. FOREVER. There’s a general laid-back attitude to most things which can be so effing frustrating (some things need urgency bruv). It’s been driving me insane but then it hit me. Why am I hurrying when nobody else is? Why am I rushing to be on time for an appointment, when the person I’m meeting has no intention of being on time? I’ve been told that I need to relax, slow down, and just accept things as they are. I might have to do that, but not because I agree with constant delay and inefficiency. Because I don’t want to die of stress and or/rage.

4. Don’t Expect Everything To Make Sense.

There are so many things which just don’t make a lick of sense. Examples below:

How can I be asking a salesperson a question, and they can’t be bothered to answer me because they’re chatting to a colleague? How can it then be other customers who step in and try to help, while the salesperson continues to ignore my increasingly loud questions?

How can Accra be just as expensive as London? People tell me the prices for things and I just want to flip tables.

How can Ashanti be on this sign for the omotuo (rice ball) special at a local chop bar?

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This is a switch to turn on the air-conditioning, isn’t it?

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No, it’s not. It’s for the water heater. Is this life?

*Puts fingers on temples and sighs* Just don’t expect things to make sense.

5. The Kindness of Strangers Is Heartwarming and Awesome.

Moving to a new country can be extremely difficult and heartbreakingly lonely. I came here knowing almost nobody, and I thought I would just have to fight it out myself. BUT GAWD (I love how my people do that, just be halfway through a sentence and suddenly scream out to the Lawd)! See the way God is set up, he sometimes places people in your path to show you the way.

When I moved to Accra, someone blessed me with this golden piece of advice: join the Ahaspora mailing list. This group is made up of awesome young African “returnees” who have come to make Accra home. They have a huge network, and they’re a resource for almost everything you could ever need. Advise on housing? Done. Recommendations for good legal advice? Yes. Where to get your nails did? No problem. When I first moved to Accra, I went out on a limb and sent out an email introducing myself to the group. The response was overwhelming; within minutes I had invites to lunch, general friendly greetings and even some potential job opportunities. Chile if you’re moving to Accra, GET ON THAT LIST NOW.

My advice would be to reach out to people, and keep your heart open. I’ve already made some new friends, and I can’t thank them enough for welcoming a stranger with open arms. They’ve checked in on me, taken me out for cupcakes, welcomed me into their homes and given me a wealth of advice and support. Y’all are the real MVPs.

So darlings that’s it for now. Keep your eyes peeled for more Accra Updates! And anyone else who has recently made the move back, or is thinking about it? Please don’t hesitate to get in touch. We’re all in this together.

Love,
Adjpants